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Teacher Preparation Summary

Friday, 8:00 – 9:15 a.m.
“Community Connections”
Dr. L. Joy Thompson-Grim, Professor of Education, San Jacinto College–South

Friday, 11:15 a.m. – 12:45 p.m.
“In the Wake of No Child Left Behind”
John Gillespie, Professor of History, San Jacinto College–North

Friday, 4:00 – 5:15 p.m.
“Developing Teachers Who Are Student Learning Centered”
Dr. Gene E. Hall, Professor of Educational Policy and Leadership, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV

Saturday, 9:00 – 10:15 a.m.
“SBEC, Teacher Prep, and AATs”
Dr. Rex Peebles, Assistant Commissioner for Academic Quality and Workforce Division, Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board


Friday, February 24th, 8:00 – 9:15 a.m.

“Community Connections”

College students preparing to become teachers can provide unique assistance for community programs aimed in alleviating academic gaps in children and adolescents.  This session will discuss a variety of community programs and resources that have been cultivated over the past five years by Dr. Joy Thompson-Grim at San Jacinto College South.  The community networks have created learning opportunities for college students that support required field work for EDUC 1301 and EDUC 2301 students while also helping elementary and secondary students who are at-risk of school failure.

Dr. L. Joy Thompson-Grim, Professor of Education, San Jacinto College–South

Dr. L. Joy Thompson-GrimDr. Thompson-Grim has over 35 years of experience in the education field and has specifically worked to build programming for students with special needs and train teachers in the area of sensorimotor processing and fundamental motor skill development. She has worked as a full-time consultant in many Houston area school districts and has also taught at University of Houston and the University of St. Thomas.

 


Friday, February 24th, 11:15 a.m. – 12:45 p.m.

“In the Wake of No Child Left Behind”

Last fall, the first generation of students to have spent every day from kindergarten through graduation under the shadow of No Child Left Behind (NCLB) entered higher education. While the relative successes of NCLB are still the subject of debate, most educational scholars believe that NCLB failed to deliver the lofty goal of substantially raising standardized reading and math scores or closing the achievement gap between white and non-white students.  In fact, numerous studies of academic preparedness among entering college freshmen suggest that levels of academic readiness have weakened rather than improved, and many professors complain of students’ poor study skills, inability to think critically, and overall unpreparedness for postsecondary expectations. Community colleges are in a unique position to address and even reverse the problems created or perpetuated by No Child Left Behind through employing or adapting the following research-based strategies: 1) Work to make students aware of the culture and the political system under which their education has been proscribed 2) Assist students in building a curriculum of inquiry and discovery in contrast to following standards dictated elsewhere 3) Replace the criterion-based, pass-or-fail assessment model with one that measures application of knowledge, and student growth.

John Gillespie, Professor of History, San Jacinto College–North

John GillespieJohn Gillespie is a Professor History at San Jacinto College in Houston, Texas. He received his B.A. at Texas Tech University, his M.Ed. at the University of Houston, and his M.L.A. at the University of St. Thomas. Currently John is working toward a Ph.D. in Humanities from Falkner University. A 16 year veteran of the classroom, John has taught middle school, high school and college History, as well as high school courses in English, Government, and Philosophy. He has presented at numerous academic conferences focusing on both the liberal arts and education.


Friday, February 24th, 4:00 – 5:15 p.m.

“Developing Teachers Who Are Student Learning Centered”

Some schools and districts are making the paradigm shift from focusing on what is taught to focusing on what students are learning. In this session the two paradigms will be reviewed and then two well-established and related research-based constructs will be applied to the design, content and evaluation of teacher education courses and programs.

Dr. Gene E. Hall, Professor of Educational Policy and Leadership, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV

Dr. Gene E. HallDr. Hall earned his Ph.D. from Syracuse University and launched his academic career with eighteen years as a faculty member and project director with the national R&D Center for Teacher Education at the University of Texas at Austin. Since then he has been a Professor of Educational Leadership at the University of Florida, Northern Colorado, and UNLV.  He twice has served as the Dean of a College of Education. Dr. Hall’s main line of research has been related to the change process in organizational settings.  He is the lead architect of the Concerns Based Adoption Model (CBAM), which places heavy emphasis on understanding and facilitating the personal side of change. This model and the related research and training programs have been tested and applied in many types of organizations including schools, business, government and the military. The work also is widely studied and applied in other countries including Australia, Belgium, Canada, England, Hong Kong, The Netherlands, Singapore, and Taiwan. He also has had career long involvement with teacher education, especially in relation to national accreditation and program innovation.


Saturday, February 25th, 9:00 – 10:15 a.m.

“SBEC, Teacher Prep, and AATs”

The State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) has recently revised its rules with regard to teacher prep programs. Teacher prep programs will be asked to “do better.” This session will summarize those changes and discuss how the AATs can play a role in teacher preparation. An update will also be given on the revision of AATs as Fields of Study.

Dr. Rex Peebles, Assistant Commissioner for Academic Quality and Workforce Division, Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board

Rex PeeblesDr. Peebles has experience as an instructor, professor, department head, dean, and vice president of instruction. He currently serves as Assistant Commissioner for Academic Quality and Workforce division at the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board. He is a recipient of the Ray Williams Outstanding Leadership Award. He has a Ph.D. in Government from The University of Texas at Austin. He co-authored Texas Politics and Government: Ideas, Institutions, and Policies and authored The Theoria and Praxis of Obligations to Future Generations.

 

Teacher Preparation Section Chair:
Crystal Tewes, San Jacinto College–South