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Sociology & Social Work Summary

Friday, 9:30 – 10:45 a.m.
“Getting the 411, Buzz, and Skinny of PBL and Critical Thinking Skills
Dr. Garrison Henderson, Professor of Sociology, Tarrant County College District–Southeast

Friday, 4:00 – 5:15 p.m.
Benefits and Challenges of Problem-Based Learning in the Sociology Classroom
Dr. Daina S. Eglitis, Associate Professor of Sociology and International Affairs, The George Washington University, Washington, DC

Saturday, 10:30 – 11:45 a.m.
“Surviving and Thriving: Using Evidence-Based Self Care”
Veronica Molina, BSW, MSSW, ACSW, Assistant Professor of Social Work, Texas A&M University–Central Texas; and Tammy Molina-­Moore, MSSW, LMSW, CTS, Field Director and Associate Lecturer, Texas A&M­‐Central Texas


Friday, February 24th, 9:30 – 10:45 a.m.

“Getting the 411, Buzz, and Skinny of PBL and Critical Thinking Skills

This presentation will cover key aspects of Problem-Based learning an effective teaching approach for student success, student engagement, and higher order, critical thinking skills among community college students. Many academic disciplines use PBL, which focuses on realistic issues that students are likely to encounter beyond the college atmosphere. Although educators increasingly emphasize critical thinking skills as a vital learning outcome, educators differ in their opinions about how critical thinking skills should be taught within classroom settings.

Dr. Garrison Henderson, Professor of Sociology, Tarrant County College District–Southeast

Dr. Garrison Henderson, Tarrant County College District–SoutheastDr. Garrison Henderson is currently a Professor of Sociology at the Tarrant County College District-Southeast Campus in Arlington, Texas. Dr. Henderson began teaching at the Southeast Campus fall 1997 as an adjunct professor of sociology. Dr. Henderson became a full-time assistant professor of sociology fall 2004. In fall 2009, Dr. Henderson received promotion in rank to Associate Professor of sociology as well tenured status. In fall 2015, Dr. Henderson was promoted to Professor of Sociology. Dr. Henderson also teaches Research Methods & Quantitative Data Analysis at the University of North Texas at Dallas. Dr. Henderson has taught a wide range of sociology courses such as marriage & family, criminology, social problems, social psychology, and the core courses such as Introduction to Sociology. Dr. Henderson is currently involved with research in the area of Problem-based learning and Critical Thinking Skills. Dr. Henderson has worked 16 years in the Federal Prison system as a counselor/facilitator of Substance Abuse for incarcerated offenders. Dr. Henderson has extensive experience and insight into the criminal personality, drug offender characteristics, psychopathology, and personality disorders.


Friday, February 24th, 4:00 – 5:15 p.m.

Benefits and Challenges of Problem-Based Learning in the Sociology Classroom

Problem-based learning (PBL) is a pedagogical approach to teaching and learning that is driven by an identified problem, query, or puzzle that the learner is motivated to solve (Boud and Feletti 1997). PBL highlights the mastery of knowledge related to an assigned problem case and the development of problem-solving skills, including the comprehensive definition of a problem, the informed understanding of its roots, and the linkage of roots to solutions. PBL has become a feature in some medical schools and has increasingly been adopted into natural and physical science education, but has not yet been widely embraced in the social sciences, including sociology. This presentation will discuss the suitability and significance of PBL in sociology classroom. It will use the author’s experiences and those of colleagues in the Department of Sociology at George Washington University to highlight the practical applications, pedagogical benefits, and challenges of PBL in the undergraduate sociology classroom, including a freshman seminar, large introductory courses in sociology and in criminal justice, and an upper-division course on social class and inequality. The conference presentation will introduce conference participants to the key characteristics of problem-based learning. It will offer an evidence-based argument that problem-based learning is an effective vehicle for putting learning directly into the hands of students and building both students’ core knowledge of the discipline and key skills for problem-solving that extend beyond the classroom. The presentation will include descriptions (with handouts) of specific cases used in courses and will discuss characteristics of effective problem cases. Attendees will have the opportunity to participate in hypothetical case construction.

Dr. Daina S. Eglitis, Associate Professor of Sociology and International Affairs, The George Washington University, Washington, DC

Dr. Daina S. Eglitis, The George Washington UniversityDaina S. Eglitis is an associate professor of sociology and international affairs at The George Washington University. She is co-author with William J. Chambliss of the introductory text Discover Sociology (Sage, 2014 and 2016). Her publications on creative pedagogical approaches have appeared in Teaching Sociology: “Social Issues and Problem-Based Learning in Sociology: Opportunities and Challenges in the Undergraduate Classroom” (co-authored with Fran Buntman and Dameon Alexander, 2016) and “Performing Theory: Dramatic Learning in the Theory Classroom” (2010).  Dr. Eglitis’s publications also include the book Imagining the Nation: History, Modernity and Revolution in Latvia and numerous articles and book chapters on problems of post-communism. Her current research focuses on gender, power, and collective memory of the Holocaust and World War II.


Saturday, February 25th, 10:30 – 11:45 a.m.

“Surviving and Thriving: Using Evidence-Based Self Care”

Stress and social work practice go hand in hand. Juggling numerous stressors such as safety concerns, limited resources, high caseloads, long hours, and continual crises takes its toll on even the most prepared professionals. Added to this is the misuse of empathy—the foundational skill of social work which can also be the kiss of death in not applied properly. As professionals in the field, we often see many social work graduates remain in the profession for a short time before giving up on their career due to burn out, vicarious trauma and other preventable factors. Seasoned professionals sometimes end up being viewed as “crusty” before they retire or leave the profession. Professional guidelines mandate that we take care of ourselves, recognize colleagues that may be struggling and seek appropriate assistance when deemed necessary. Building on the basic social work foundations, this workshop will provide an extended knowledge base of some easy and cost effective applications on how to manage stress. In order to provide participants with a foundational level of their current baseline, the Professional Quality of Life Scale-Compassion Satisfaction and Fatigue Subscales will be administered.

Veronica Molina, BSW, MSSW, ACSW, Assistant Professor of Social Work, Texas A&M University–Central Texas; and Tammy Molina-­Moore, MSSW, LMSW, CTS, Field Director and Associate Lecturer, Texas A&M­‐Central Texas

Veronica Molina, Texas A&M Central TexasVeronica Molina is Assistant Professor, Assistant Field Coordinator and Title IV-E Director at Texas A&M University–Central Texas (TAMUCT) Social Work Department. She holds both a Bachelor’s and Master’s degree in Social Work from the University of Texas Pan-American. She is currently a doctoral student with Capella University working on a Doctorate in Social Work. Prior to coming to TAMU-CT in January 2012, Mrs. Molina worked with Child Protective Services for eight and a half years, focusing on advocating for the abused/neglected children of Texas. Initially, as a CPS Investigative Specialist in the Rio Grande Valley, she worked with the large Hispanic population investigating cases of abuse and neglect, and addressing sensitive issues such as illegal immigration, indigent services, and poor living conditions in Colonias. Upon moving to Central Texas in 2009, she worked as a CPS Investigative Supervisor, managing up to seven CPS workers and attending to the unique issues of military families. Her current community service includes serving as a board of director for Bell County Habitat for Humanity, board member and secretary for Heritage House of Central Texas, and advisory board member for the Salvation Army. A member of the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) since 2006, she currently serves as the secretary for the NASW Central Texas branch steering committee. She is also a member of the Association of Baccalaureate Program Directors and the Council on Social Work Education. She serves on several university committees, and has been the faculty advisor for student organizations on campus; Student Association of Social Workers and Warriors for Shelter Pets. She currently teaches such courses as Introduction to Social Work with Service Learning, Child Welfare, and Field.

Tammy Molina-Moore, Texas A&M–Central TexasTammy Molina-­Moore is the Field Director for the Bachelor of Social Work Program and an associate lecturer. Ms. Molina-­Moore has been with TAMUCT since August 2009. She received her MSSW from the University of Texas at Arlington in 2006 and her BSW from the University of Texas at Arlington in 2004. Prior to arriving at A&M­‐Central Texas, she worked in the medical field, juvenile probation, and victim services. Ms. Molina-­Moore was a certified Juvenile Probation Officer and worked with all classifications of juveniles and their families. Her community involvement includes being the NASW Branch Chair for an eight-­county area, national disaster response, and community planning. Her institutional involvement at A&M‐Central Texas includes being a founding member of the Faculty Senate, Executive Committee member of the Faculty Senate, member of the University Budget Committee, member of the Academic Council, member of the Student Service Fee Committee and several ad hoc committees. Ms. Molina-Moore has presented at several national conferences, including the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE), Baccalaureate Program Directors (BPD), National Association of Social Workers (NASW), Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences (ACJS), and the South Western Association of Criminal Justice (SWACJ). She also serves on the BPD national field committee and is the NASW National Leadership and Identification Committee Representative for Texas, Louisiana, and Arizona. Ms. Molina-­Moore also teaches such courses as Service Learning, Social Welfare Policy, Sexual Abuse and Sexual Assault and Probation and Social Work. Her current research areas include Professional Self Care and Ethics.

 

 

Sociology & Social Work Section Co-Chairs:
Renee Henry, Central Texas College
and
Tasha Brown, Central Texas College