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History Summary

Friday, 9:30 – 10:45 a.m.
“The Complex Role of Slavery and the Civil War in Texas History”
Dr. Charles Grear, Professor of History and Online Manager, Central Texas College

Saturday, 10:30 – 11:45 a.m.
“To See the Things of Spain: Andean Travelers in the Spanish Imperial World”
Dr. José Carlos de la Puente, Associate Professor of History, Texas State University


Friday, February 24th, 9:30 – 10:45 a.m.

“The Complex Role of Slavery and the Civil War in Texas History”

There has been no greater transformative period in United States and Texas then the American Civil War. Though the causes of the war are complex, slavery is the prominent dispute that propelled a country to split apart and finally face the issue haunting the country for most of its history. Complicating these issues in Texas is its diverse population, geographic location on the frontier, and history with foreign nations. Teaching the topic of slavery and emphasizing the important role the Civil War played in Texas history is a complex task, especially with the diversification in higher education classrooms. This presentation will try to provide perspective, not only Texas’ role with slavery and the Civil War, but insight in teaching this sensitive topic to a student population from varying backgrounds.

Dr. Charles Grear, Professor of History and Online Manager, Central Texas College

Dr. Charles GrearCharles D. Grear received his Ph.D. in history at Texas Christian University and has taught history for over ten years, at Texas A&M University, Prairie View A&M University, and currently as an Professor of History and Online Manager at Central Texas College. A specialist in Texas and Civil War history, he has authored five articles, eight book chapters, and eight books including; Texans and War: New Interpretations on the Military History of the Lone Star State (Texas A&M University Press, 2012), The House Divided: America in the Era of Civil War and Reconstruction (Abigail Press, 2011), Why Texans Fought in the Civil War (Texas A&M University Press, 2010), Beyond Myths and Legends: A Narrative History of Texas (Abigail Press, 2008), The Fate of Texas:  The Civil War and the Lone Star State (University of Arkansas Press, 2008).  Future projects include co-editing the Civil War in the Heartland Series for Southern Illinois University Press with Steven E. Woodworth, a book about Gano’s Brigade in the Indian Territory during the Civil War, and a general history of the Civil War in the Trans-Mississippi. Dr. Grear is a recipient of the Lawrence T. Jones III Research Fellowship in Civil War Texas History for the Texas State Historical Association, the fellowship to the 2007 West Point Summer Seminar in Military History, and the Burney Parker Research Fellowship for the Texas Collection at Baylor University.


Saturday, February 25th, 10:30 – 11:45 a.m.

“To See the Things of Spain: Andean Travelers in the Spanish Imperial World”

This talk discusses the journeys of native Andeans to the Habsburg royal court during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. It aims at a Social History of these travelers: where did they come from? Why did they visit Spain? What transatlantic networks sustained their journeys? In sum, what did they share aside from the trip across the ocean? The analysis will reveal that these travelers’ identities as well as their strategies for ascending the social ladder, their relations and aspirations as royal subjects traversing the early modern Atlantic were anchored in the world of the Indians who dwelt and prospered in multifaceted cities.

Dr. José Carlos de la Puente, Associate Professor of History, Texas State University

Dr. José Carlos de la PuenteJosé Carlos de la Puente is Associate Professor of History at Texas State University. His research focuses on indigenous political and legal cultures and state building in the Andes. His current book manuscript, “Andean Cosmopolitans: Indigenous Journeys to the Habsburg Royal Court” is under review. His work has been supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities, Harvard’s International Seminar on the History of the Atlantic World, and the Escuela de Estudios Hispanoamericanos.

 

 

History Section Chair:
Jahue Anderson, North Central Texas College