Loading...

Criminal Justice/Forensic Science Summary

Friday, 11:15 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
“Campus Concealed Carry Policies”
Dr. Bob Harkins, Associate Vice President for Campus Safety and Security, University of Texas at Austin

Friday, 4:00 – 5:15 p.m.
“Baby Katherine Case”
Greg Cantu, Detective, Laredo Police Department

Saturday, 9:00 – 10:15 a.m.
“Understanding the Texas Commission on Law Enforcement Role in Criminal Justice Training Programs”
Sgt. Malcolm Jackson, Statewide Academy Evaluator, Texas Commission on Law Enforcement


Friday, February 24th, 11:15 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

“Campus Concealed Carry Policies”

On Monday, August 1, 2016 the state’s new Campus Carry law went into effect, and license holders will generally be allowed to carry concealed handguns at public universities. University of Texas at Austin leadership has been working closely with students, faculty and staff members from across campus to implement the law as smoothly as possible. We have heard and understand the concerns raised by many members of the campus community. We are working to address those concerns within the parameters of the law and to answer the many questions that have been raised about the new law.

As we approach the implementation of the new law, I would like to emphasize these important points:

  1. The difference between concealed carry and open carry.
  2. Handling areas on campus where concealed carry of handguns is prohibited, including some portions of residence halls.
  3. What the law means when stating conceal carriers must have their weapon about their person at all times while on campus.
  4. How license holders must think through the activities of their day. There may be times when activities may preclude carrying on a given day, since there is no storage on campus except in a privately owned vehicle.
  5. Regardless of your opinion about the legislation, everyone is required to follow the laws laid out by the State of Texas, and the policies of the universities. We also ask that everyone show respect toward other members of the university community who have different views.

This session will be very interactive and encourage questions.

Dr. Bob Harkins, Associate Vice President for Campus Safety and Security, University of Texas at Austin

Dr. Bob Harkins, University of Texas at AustinBob Harkins became the associate vice president for Campus Safety and Security on September 1, 2005. He coordinates the activities of Emergency Preparedness, Environmental Health and Safety, Fire Prevention Services, Parking and Transportation Services, and The University of Texas at Austin Police Department. Bob enriches our community with over 12 years of extensive knowledge in leading the campus safety and security programs of two major universities. Prior to assuming his current position, Bob spent 27 years in the Army, retiring as a colonel. Over the course of his military career he was awarded two Silver Stars for valor and two Purple Hearts. Throughout his career he has had a variety of assignments focusing on campus safety and security. Bob earned his doctorate in education from Pittsburgh University in 1998. He continuously plans the steps toward making The University of Texas at Austin the safest campus in the nation by leading the Safety and Security Committee and reaching out to students, faculty and staff to create a safety-minded community.


Friday, February 24th, 4:00 – 5:15 p.m.

“Baby Katherine Case”

On October 9, 2009, Laredo Police Department held a press conference at their headquarters to announce the arrest of a 16 year old male for the capital murder of 2 year old Katherine Cardenas as Mexican Authorities walked the suspect over International Bridge #1, and delivered him to ICE agents. Baby Katherine was found lifeless outside her west Laredo home after being reported initially as missing. The Laredo Police Department’s Criminal Investigative Divisions all converged and began to investigate the case. While detectives waited on the forensic evidence results, the primary suspect left Laredo and went into hiding in Nuevo Laredo Mexico. When forensic lab results returned, the findings confirmed that the 16 year old male suspect was responsible for the murder of Katherine Cardenas. Now armed with the proof, detectives collaborated with ICE agents who along with the Policia Minesterial del Estado de Tamaulipas, worked through the night and day trying to locate the suspect over several weeks. The charge of capital murder did not carry a death penalty in this case because the offender was a juvenile. At the press conference the Webb County Attorney stated that her office was seeking to certify this juvenile suspect as an adult. Attending the press conference was lead investigator Greg Cantu, whose specialized investigative forensic techniques that he acquired when he attended the National Forensic Academy in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, were found to be particularly helpful.

Greg Cantu, Detective, Laredo Police Department

Greg Cantu, Federal Bureau of InvestigationDetective Greg Cantu graduated the Regional Police Academy in August 1990. He served seven years as a patrol officer and was promoted to Investigator in 1997. In 1998 he was assigned to the Criminal Investigation Division as well as the Domestic Violence Unit. In January 2000 he was reassigned to the Crimes Against Persons Unit (Robbery/Homicide) where he has investigated over 150 murders. Detective Cantu attended the University of Tennessee, National Forensics Academy where he studied post-blast investigation, blood pattern analysis, forensic anthropology burial recovery, forensic entomology, and latent print recovering on deceased. Detective Cantu also attended the University of North Texas where he was certified in Shooting Incident Reconstruction/Officer Involved Shooting. Currently, Detective Cantu is assigned to the FBI Violent crime unit, where he is investigating violent crimes in the border area, including any kidnappings in Mexico involving American citizens.


Saturday, February 25th, 9:00 – 10:15 a.m.

“Understanding the Texas Commission on Law Enforcement Role in Criminal Justice Training Programs”

The dynamic evolution of today’s social environment presents unique challenges and opportunities for police officers and other public safety professionals. The Texas Commission on Law Enforcement (TCOLE) serves as the regulatory agency overseeing the education and training, testing and administering of State-issued licenses required to serve as a police officer, emergency 9-1-1 dispatcher, or jailer. The Texas Occupations Code and the Texas Administrative Code promulgate the applicable rules and requirements for academies and licensure programs. Understanding TCOLE’s true role and responsibility affords college administrators, legal counsel, student advisors and professors the opportunity to better serve those seeking careers in criminal justice and public safety professions. Failure to fully comprehend and adhere to them can have a deleterious impact on college police academies and training programs. A collaborative effort among TCOLE, college administrators, professors and students presents a great opportunity to make a positive impact on the process. Bring your questions and engage the discussion directly with the Texas Commission on Law Enforcement.

Sgt. Malcolm Jackson, Statewide Academy Evaluator, Texas Commission on Law Enforcement

Malcolm Jackson, Texas Commission on Law EnforcementMalcolm Jackson has over 30 years of professional law enforcement related service as a peace officer, firefighter, EMT, and telecommunications dispatcher. Mr. Jackson served multiple administrative and leadership roles in law enforcement, including serving as Watauga’s Director of Public Safety, Southlake’s Director of Community Services, and Coordinator for the Tarrant County College District’s Criminal Justice Training Program (police academy, including academic component). Mr. Jackson currently serves as an Academy and Contract Evaluator with the TCOLE, the State agency that holds oversight on police academy and police training programs. Mr. Jackson holds an associate degree in criminal justice from Tarrant County College, a bachelor of business administration degree from Northwood University, and a Master’s Degree in dispute resolution from Southern Methodist University. He served two years (1999-2000) on the International Chiefs of Police advisory council for small departments, as well as three years on the ethics advisory council for the Center for Law Enforcement Ethics located at the Center for American and International Law. He also served on the North Lake College Dispute Resolution Advisory Committee and on the Board of Directors for the Southwest Conflict Resolution Network. Mr. Jackson also completed a practicum with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission in Dallas, Texas.

 

 

Criminal Justice/Forensic Science Section Chair:
Robyn Marcak, Blinn College