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Biology Summary

Friday, 11:15 a.m. – 12:45 p.m.
“Team-Based Learning: Using Teams to Engage Students in Learning”
Dr. Rebecca Orr, Professor of Biology, Collin College–Spring Creek (Courtesy of Pearson)

Friday, 4:00 – 5:15 p.m.
“Environmental Collaboration Between NGOs and Community Colleges”
Dr. Lisa Bellows, Professor of Science, North Central Texas College

Saturday, 9:00 – 10:15 a.m.
“Adding Relevancy to Your Course with Minimal Effort and Time”
Dr. Jennifer Scoby, Professor of Biology, Illinois Central College, East Peoria, IL (Courtesy of McGraw-Hill)


Friday, February 24th, 11:15 a.m. – 12:45 p.m.

Team-Based Learning: Using Teams to Engage Students in Learning

Team‐based learning (TBL) is an active learning strategy that enhances student learning, understanding, and retention of content while building interpersonal skills. Central to this strategy is training students to be responsible for their own learning so that they come to class prepared to engage in higher level thinking and problem solving. This presentation will show you how team‐based learning can be used in any discipline to create an energizing classroom environment. Strategies for meeting the challenges of TBL implementation will be discussed. Additionally, specific examples of technology that can be used to facilitate your TBL classroom success will be highlighted and discussed. Team-based learning utilizes peer‐instruction to create a teaching and learning experience that is fun and rewarding for both the teacher and the learner!

Dr. Rebecca Orr, Professor of Biology, Collin College–Spring Creek (Courtesy of Pearson)

Rebecca OrrRebecca earned her Ph.D. in Cell Regulation at U.T. Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas. She has taught a variety of freshman through senior level biology courses for over 18 years. Her passion is investigating strategies that increase student success in the majors introductory biology classroom, and she enjoys focusing on the creation of learning opportunities that both engage and challenge students. Much of Rebecca’s efforts are spent incorporating technology into the lecture portion of the course through a variety of means, and analyzing how various strategies and technologies impact student learning. She is currently on the implementation of team-based learning in her on-campus, freshman majors biology course.


Friday, February 24th, 4:00 – 5:15 p.m.

“Environmental Collaboration Between NGOs and Community Colleges”

Dr. Lisa Bellows of North Central Texas College has extended the boundaries of her lecture hall and science laboratory to embrace the interrelated and complex aspects of social, economic and ecological concepts in biological and sustainable agriculture courses. The NGO has continued with financial support since 2012 and presently funds the community college with salary support, intern opportunities, speakers, and other funding. Additionally, the NGO has underwritten professional development for instructors and students. Dr. Bellows has sequestered funding, land, and enthusiasm from the local community and will share some of her methods with us today.

Dr. Lisa Bellows, Professor of Science, North Central Texas College

Dr. Lisa BellowsLisa Bellows, Ph.D. is a full-time faculty member at North Central Texas College, Director of Thomsen Foundation’s Montague County Nature Preserve, and a Certified Educator for Holistic Management International. Dr. Bellows spearheads the NCTC Josey Institute of Agroecology funded by the Dixon Water Foundation. Within the NCTC Josey Institute of Agroecology, Bellows has established and operates the Promoting Agriculture and Conservation Education (PACE) Project.

 


Saturday, February 25th, 9:00 – 10:15 a.m.

“Adding Relevancy to Your Course with Minimal Effort and Time”

Relevance is one of the most important keys a teacher can use to unlock student learning. Students eagerly soak in information they see as being both interesting to them, and worth knowing. Teachers working hard to transmit their knowledge waste their efforts, breath, and valuable class time when they fail to generate and hold the students’ personal interest or trust in the usefulness of the material. Learn easy tricks for adding relevancy into your course without a major upheaval to your time.

Dr. Jennifer Scoby, Professor of Biology, Illinois Central College, East Peoria, IL (Courtesy of McGraw-Hill)

Dr. Jennifer ScobyJen Scoby is a full-time tenured biology professor at the very school that first inspired her to switch from an art major to a biology major, Illinois Central College (ICC) in East Peoria, Illinois. Jen works daily to infuse innovative instruction and excitement into all of her courses, using tools such as demos, group and solo activities, and student theatrical interpretations of tough material. She finds that using Connect is a great way to prepare students for engaging and effective classroom time as well as overall course success. Her teaching load regularly includes both online and face-to-face formats of a very large life science course for non-majors, a cellular and molecular biology course for majors, and a principles of anatomy and physiology course for majors. Jen participates in numerous college-wide committees and has fun acting as an advisor for ICC’s Student Association for the Environment, coordinating events both on and off campus. She is proud to have additionally spearheaded a major redesign and growth of ICC’s biannual Sustainability Presentation Contest. Jen fills her free time with outside play, with great loves for running, biking, kayaking, hiking, camping, skiing, and traveling. Jen also often gets involved in community work. When not teaching, outside, traveling, or trying to change things for the better, Jen loves getting out (or in) with friends, cooking, movies, reading, sketching and painting.

 

 

Biology Section Chair:
Karen Killion, Blinn College–Brenham