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"I think there is something more important than believing: Action! The world is full of dreamers, there aren't enough who will move ahead and begin to take concrete steps to actualize their vision."

- Clement Stone


 

Events: 2013 Humanities Schedule

Humanities Summary

Friday, 11:15 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.
“How to Teach a Big Book to a Big Class on a Big Subject of Little Interest”

Speaker: Lois Fichner-Rathus, Professor of Art History, College of New Jersey

Saturday, 9:00 - 10:15 a.m.
"Humanities Professional Development Opportunities for Community College Faculty"

Speaker: David A. Berry, Executive Director, Community College Humanities Association


 

Friday, 11:15 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.
“How to Teach a Big Book to a Big Class on a Big Subject of Little Interest”

“The Survey.” Two words that have the potential to strike fear in the minds and bodies of the non-major undergrad—fear of TMI (too much information), fear of note-taking, fear of memorization, and, the most paralyzing of all, fear of boredom. The Survey, as a course model for the liberal learning or distribution requirements of college curricula in disciplines such as humanities, art history, art appreciation, and music and theatre history, has been around for generations, along with the big, thick textbooks that aim to do everything (including weighing down backpacks and serving as doorstops). The sheer quantity of material is daunting for students and challenging for the instructor. This session considers the different roles that the “big book” might play in mastering the survey in humanities disciplines and offers practical, tried-and-true strategies for teaching and surviving the experience.

Speaker: Lois Fichner-Rathus, Professor of Art History, College of New Jersey

Lois Fichner-RathusLois Fichner-Rathus has been teaching survey courses to non-majors in the humanities, art history, and art appreciation for almost three decades at the University of Texas, El Paso and The College of New Jersey, as well as upper level courses in Art History and interdisciplinary studies. She received her M.A. in the History of Art from Williams College and her Ph.D. in the History, Theory, and Criticism of Art from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Her textbooks include Understanding Art 10e (Cengage), Understanding Art: A Concise History (Cengage), and Foundations of Art and Design, Enhanced Media Edition (Cengage). She is co-author, with Lawrence S. Cunningham and John J. Reich, of Culture and Values: A Survey of the Humanities 8e (Cengage).


 

Saturday, 9:00 - 10:15 a.m.
"Humanities Professional Development Opportunities for Community College Faculty"

David A. Berry, Executive Director of the Community College Humanities Association (CCHA) and Professor of History at Essex County College (NJ), will provide information on the state of the humanities in the community college classroom, the role of the humanities in the curriculum and the professional development opportunities offered by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the CCHA. Additionally, several faculty who have participated in NEH and CCHA programs will share their experiences and discuss ideas for application of research in the classroom.

Speaker: David A. Berry, Executive Director, Community College Humanities Association

David BerryDavid A. Berry is professor of history and director of the Honors Program in the Division of the Humanities at Essex County College, Newark, New Jersey. He is Executive Director and Chair, Board of Directors of the Community College Humanities Association, a position he has held since 1989. He serves as a National Facilitator for the Phi Theta Kappa Seminar for Certified Leaders in the Leadership Development Program and as Project Manager for National Endowment for the Humanities Landmarks of American History & Culture Workshops for Community College Teachers program from 2005 through 2012. He also served as a project manager for over 15 NEH Summer Institutes. He is now director of the NEH funded project, "Advancing the Humanities in Community Colleges: A NEH Bridging Cultures Project." In 1997 he was awarded the National Humanities Medal by President and Mrs. Clinton. He was the first community college educator to receive this prestigious award. He has advanced the role of the humanities in community colleges and has served as the national voice for the study of humanities in two-year colleges.

Humanities Section Co-chairs:
Jane England, North Central Texas College, and
Karen Marcotte, Palo Alto College